Frankincense

Frankincense, is derived from the milky white sap that is secreted by the Frankincense tree.




Known as Boswellia carterii, after the tree’s sap droplets are allowed to dry and harden into tear-shapes on the tree over the course of a few days, they are finally scraped off to be made into an essential oil.





HISTORY AND BENEFITS OF FRANKINCENSE

The Boswellia tree is native to regions such as Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula.

The history of Frankincense usage has Medieval roots and is closely linked with being burned in sacred places and religious rituals, it is valued for its powerful aroma and the white smoke it exudes when burned.


Franc”is known to mean “pure” while “encens” comes from a word that means “to burn.” It was thus considered a “pure incense” and the most desirable of all the other types of incense.


Harvesting Frankincense resin involves farmers making incisions in the tree bark until it exudes its secreted milky fluid, which it expels in the form of small “tears.” The droplets are allowed to dry on the tree for ten days, after which time they are scraped off and given another period of time to completely harden. At this dried stage, the resin looks like tiny, rough, uneven, translucent rocks.


The quality of the Frankincense tree resin depends on the climate, environmental conditions, and the harvesting period.


Aromatherapy:

Frankincense works as an expectorant to clear the nasal passageway, promote the relief of congestion, and encourage easy breathing. It's sweet, woody aroma is sedative and enhances mood by diminishing feelings of stress and anxiety while improving concentration and memory.


Cosmetically:

Frankincense oil helps to to reduce the appearance of wrinkles and skin imperfections such as discoloration. It stimulates the growth of new cells, and when used on cuts it promotes faster healing.


Medicinally:

Frankincense works as an anti-inflammatory oil and is known to soothe inflamed skin by reducing the sensations of redness, swelling, and itching. It helps to disinfect and tighten the pores, thereby promoting the speedy healing of cuts, wounds, and scars. It is used to relieve flatulence, stimulate the growth of new skin cells, and stimulate blood flow and circulation among other competencies.


Uses:

Frankincense essential oil can be added to a diffuser or vaporizer and inhaled for its sedative, earthy fragrance that is known to enhance the mood, combat stress and anxiety. A few drops of Frankincense added to a diffuser or mixed with water makes a pleasant air freshening spray and can eliminate airborne bacteria. Sprayed in a bedroom at night, it can help achieve a state of relaxation and readiness for sleep.


After dilution with an unscented carrier oil, Frankincense oil can be absorbed into the skin via topical application and in a relaxing bath, a few drops of the oil can be added to relieve stress.

When mixed with baking soda and Lemon essential oil, it creates a scrubbing substance that is useful for removing grease and for leaving the area unsoiled and aromatic. For additional advice on how to use or blend oils please contact MrsNurse at contact@mrandmrsnurse.com


Cautions:

For external use only: MrandMrsNurse always suggest consulting with a medical practitioner before using essential oils for therapeutic purposes. Pregnant and nursing women are especially advised not to use essential oils without the medical advice of a physician. In the event of an allergic reaction, discontinue use of the product and see a doctor, pharmacist, or allergist immediately for a health assessment and appropriate remedial action. To prevent side effects, consult with a medical professional prior to use.


Essential Oils should always be stored in an area that is inaccessible to children.





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