Frankincense

Frankincense, is derived from the milky white sap that is secreted by the Frankincense tree.




Known as Boswellia carterii, after the tree’s sap droplets are allowed to dry and harden into tear-shapes on the tree over the course of a few days, they are finally scraped off to be made into an essential oil.





HISTORY AND BENEFITS OF FRANKINCENSE

The Boswellia tree is native to regions such as Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula.

The history of Frankincense usage has Medieval roots and is closely linked with being burned in sacred places and religious rituals, it is valued for its powerful aroma and the white smoke it exudes when burned.


Franc”is known to mean “pure” while “encens” comes from a word that means “to burn.” It was thus considered a “pure incense” and the most desirable of all the other types of incense.


Harvesting Frankincense resin involves farmers making incisions in the tree bark until it exudes its secreted milky fluid, which it expels in the form of small “tears.” The droplets are allowed to dry on the tree for ten days, after which time they are scraped off and given another period of time to completely harden. At this dried stage, the resin looks like tiny, rough, uneven, translucent rocks.